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Haverhill Man Charged In Lynn District Court With Impersonating A Police Officer

The following story was reported by the Lawrence Eagle Tribune on November 11, 2008:

‘A city man faces criminal charges in Lynn after he allegedly
impersonated a police officer claiming to be conducting a fundraiser
for a police-sponsored sports program.  Lynn police said Christen Agnew
called a pizza shop in that city on June 23, representing himself to be
a Boston police officer conducting a fundraiser for the department’s
youth golf program.  The owners agreed to donate $100 and told Agnew to
come to the shop and get the money.  When he went to the shop, the
owner asked for identification, and Agnew told him he would go and
retrieve it from his car but never returned to the store.  The shop
owner followed Agnew out the door and wrote down the license plate
number of his car, helping police to identify and locate him.  Agnew,
34, of 73 Marshland St. was summonsed to appear in Lynn District Court
on charges of impersonating a police officer, attempted larceny and
driving after suspension of his license.  During his arraignment
Thursday in Lynn District Court, Judge Michael Uhlarik warned Agnew not to drive and ordered him to return to court on Dec. 18 for a pretrial hearing.”  Read Full Story, Lawrence Eagle Tribune November 11, 2008. 

We recommend clicking on one of the following links if you have been charged with a these crimes or similar criminal offenses:

Lawrence Massachusetts Criminal Defense Lawyers

Lynn Massachusetts Criminal Defense Lawyers.

Lynn Massachusetts Theft Crimes and Larceny Defense Lawyers

Lynn Massachusetts Motor Vehicle Crimes Defense Lawyers

The crimes with which Agnew was charged are more fully defined as follows in Massachusetts.

Impersonating A Police Officer is
a crime pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 268 Section 33.
The law states that anyone who pretends to be a police officer shall be
punished by a fine of not more than four hundred dollars or by
imprisonment for not more than one year.

Attempted Larceny
Attempts to commit crimes are considered crimes in Massachusetts.  The
statute of attempts to commit a crime in Massachusetts is Massachusetts
General Laws Chapter 274 Section 6 which states that whoever attempts
to commit a crime by doing any act toward its commission, but fails in
its perpetration, or is intercepted or prevented in its perpetration,
shall, except as otherwise provided, be punished as follows: First, by
imprisonment in the state prison for not more than ten years, if he
attempts to commit a crime punishable with death. Second, by
imprisonment in the state prison for not more than five years or in a
jail or house of correction for not more than two and one half years,
if he attempts to commit a crime, except any larceny under section
thirty of chapter two hundred and sixty-six, punishable by imprisonment
in the state prison for life or for five years or more. Third, by
imprisonment in a jail or house of correction for not more than one
year or by a fine of not more than three hundred dollars, if he
attempts to commit a crime, except any larceny under said section
thirty, punishable by imprisonment in the state prison for less than
five years or by imprisonment in a jail or house of correction or by a
fine. Fourth, by imprisonment in a jail or house of correction for not
more than two and one half years or by a fine, or by both such fine and
imprisonment, if he attempts to commit any larceny punishable under
said section thirty. Under the circumstances of this case Agnew is
looking at a maximum of 2 1/2 years in jail. 

Driving With A Suspended License
Typically this crime is punishable by a fine or a jail sentence of up
to 10 days.  If however your license was suspended for OUI (DUI) you
are looking at a minimum mandatory 60 days in jail.